Image #261 – A Soggy Hummingbird

Image #261

 

A soggy hummingbird gives me the eye during our two days of constant rain. Thankfully it was constant and not torrential but it was seriously constant and it made it tough for our friends who live in trees.  Where do they go when night falls?  Certainly some are minding nests and protecting young ones. Last night must have been a long one because the rain did not cease.  First order of business when the rain stopped? Off to Tractor Supply for more birdseed, of course.  ❧

Image #260 – Hummingbird in the rain

Ruby throat hummingbird

Ruby throat hummingbird

It has been a wet day here in Western North Carolina. Wet and cool. Natives are already predicting a long, cold winter.  But for the moment it is still summer and there are baby birds to feed.  Today my feeder was like a drive-thru at a fast-food restaurant. At one point I counted eight cardinals gathered round the feeders. Some of the males flew in to frighten the poor house finches who look so miserable in weather like this. Once the finches were gone the cardinals fed peacefully in some pre-ordained order. Who knows how all these things work.

The hummingbirds have also been in and out all day. That’s one of them in the picture. Notice the raindrop on his head. Hummingbirds rarely feed at the same time. They must have “little bird syndrome” because they are quick to drive away the other hummers. I suppose they each get enough. There were at least three today and I spent so much time observing them that I began to notice the traits and slightly different coloring.

There were at least 13 species of bird at my feeders today. It was a good day, despite the weather ❧

Image #75 — Sub-adult Ruby-throat Hummingbird

Image #75Read enough bird identification guides and you come across some curious terms. Like “sub-adult”. Why not “young adult”? Why not “aged juvenile”?  Oh well… He’s strong and well-fed. May he live long and prosper. ☙