Image #245 – Ferndale

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Humboldt County is very large and quite diverse.  Geographically it is about the size of Connecticut.  There are the notorious marijuana grows in the mountains and forests but there is also a lot of other agriculture in and around this county. The area is also very old and some towns have maintained the architectural flavor of their history. Ferndale is a perfect example.

Crossing Fernbridge (above) you begin to immediately feel that something is different. The dairy farms that dot the landscape are neat and well maintained. Signs welcome you to Ferndale and upon arrival you are transported back in time to the Victorian era that marked a heyday of this town.

Catholic church in Ferndale
Catholic church in Ferndale

The Catholic Church is a prime example of the Victorian architecture that has been maintained throughout the town.  All the storefronts in the town are from the late 1800s and early 1900s.  It is very peaceful and gives you a real sense of how American used to be. ❧

The Victorian Hotel where lunch is a relaxing and enjoyable experience.
The Victorian Hotel where lunch is a relaxing and enjoyable experience.
This store sign shows the wonderful Victorian typography.
This store sign shows the wonderful Victorian typography.
Such a clean and welcoming garage!
Such a clean and welcoming garage!

 

 

 

 

Image #202 – Holiday Inn, circa 1950

Abandoned motel in north Georgia
Abandoned motel in north Georgia

There was once a time in America when no two motels were the same. As the great day of the automobile blossomed so did accommodations for weary travelers.  There were many “Mom & Pop” motels that consisted of small cabins, like this one that I found abandoned in north Georgia. Even though there were many styles the colors of green and white seemed a common thread.  ❧

Image #128 – Uganda Medical Mission – 2008

Image #128

Recently I saw an acquaintance whom I had not seen in more than a decade. He had heard about my medical missions from mutual friends and was particularly interested in my trip to Uganda. When I told him how much I loved Uganda he asked why and the answer was quick in coming. “The people. They are noble and good.”  Ugandans have a regal bearing that is hard to explain but I feel that several of my pictures captured their spirit. So, for this week of Alice’s WanderLand blogs we will travel to Uganda.  Our mission was in Gulu, which is the largest city in Northern Uganda. We saw mainly women and children, most of whom were HIV+ or had AIDS. In four days the fifteen member team would see close to 2,000 individuals. For most it was a routine visit to a medical clinic. Pills were provided to fight intestinal parasites, vitamins were given for the children.   But for some this trip to see Western doctors was an opportunity for help.  In some cases the result was successful…in others it was far too late.   It was a experience I will never forget. ☙

With the Myakka River running at flood stage alligators in Myakka River State Park are like kids let out for summer vacation.  Throughout the late winter and spring months, alligators were forced into smaller and smaller areas in the Park.  It was easy to spot them from the Park Drive bridge. One day last May I counted more than a dozen ‘gators visible from the bridge.  They were all pushed into a small remnant of the River.  But now!  The school doors have opened and the alligators are everywhere!  The Park is nothing but water and as you drive along the Park Drive you hear the ‘gators “talking” to each other — a strange snorting noise that those unfamiliar with alligators attribute to bullfrogs.  But make no mistake, the ‘gators have courted and the rising waters have been as welcome as Levittown was to the returning soldiers of World War II.  Nests are being made, eggs are being laid, and soon the Park will have many new ‘gators to amuse the tourists.

This handsome young gator was no more than three feet off the main drive in the Park.

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